Saarvabhaumik Nainika: Reducing avoidable blindness through IT enabled vision centres - CSR Projects India
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Last Updated:  06/11/2019

 

Project Pitch By: CBM India Trust

 

Proposed Project Title


Saarvabhaumik Nainika: Reducing avoidable blindness through IT enabled vision centres

 

Thematic Area

Eradicating hunger, poverty and malnutrition, promoting health care, sanitation & safe drinking water

Sub Thematic Area

Hospital infrastructure, medical camps, surgeries, healthcare awareness & rehabilitation

Project Synopsis

The three-year project intent to set up vision centres (VCs) for providing primary eye care services in selected locations across India, thereby reducing avoidable blindness. The project will reach a population of 50000 in one location. The project will contribute directly to the focus areas of the National Programme for Control of Blindness by working throughout the health care system to strengthen both quality of services through vison centre, capacity building, infrastructure and support for equipment and supplies, and through improving access to services through community engagement and strengthening referral mechanisms.
 
 
 

Overview of the Proposed Project

Estimated Budget
INR 0.3 Cr - INR 0.6 Cr
Proposed Location
Karnataka, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh

Key Project Partners
Government,NGOs,Companies

Project Status
Already Implemented-Replicable
 

Facts

Beneficiary Type (Primary): General
Beneficiary Type (Secondary): PWDs
Estimated No. of Beneficiaries: above 10000 Individuals
Status of Baseline Survey: Already Done
 
 
 

Proposed Project Description

This project aims to strengthen eye health services and infrastructure for delivery of high quality, affordable and accessible treatment through vision centers. In India, 18.6 million people have blindness. However, 80% of blindness is preventable with early identification & treatment which can be made possible through vision centers. People with visual impairment are more likely to be income poor, unemployed and excluded from education, healthcare, and social networks. Malnutrition and a lack of education compound the prevalence and incidence of preventable eye diseases. Equally, avoidable blindness disproportionately affects women and girls, but for various socio-economic reasons, they are much less likely to seek help. Furthermore, many conditions that lead to blindness in children also cause mortality, and regular eye screening may help early detection and treatment. Blindness and visual impairment are both a cause and a consequence of poverty. Investing in preventing blindness dramatically improves the lives of individuals and their families; this includes the economic benefit raised by not only the patients but also their family members being able to return to work. This is possible through vision centers at the primary level.


For this project, vision centers are chosen based on less Cataract Surgical Rate per state which gives an indication as to where new initiatives should be developed. In the proposed areas, people do not have access to affordable and timely eye care services. The delay in treatment often leads to a loss of eyesight. Hence, the vision centers will act as a one-stop solution for eye screening, referrals, and treatment of eye ailments which helps to prevent loss of eyesight.


CSR/million

States

> 7500

AP, Gujarat, Haryana, Punjab, TN, Chandigarh

5000 – 7499

Goa, Karnataka, MP, MH, Uttarakhand, Delhi

3000 – 4999

CG, HP, Kerala, Rajasthan, UP, WB

<3000

Bihar, J&K, Jharkhand, Orissa, N-E

 

The three-year project intended to set up vision centers (VCs) for providing primary eye care services in selected locations across India, thereby reducing avoidable blindness. The project will reach a population of 50000 in one location.

The project will contribute directly to the focus areas of the National Programme for Control of Blindness by working throughout the health care system to strengthen both qualities of services through vision center, capacity building, infrastructure and support for equipment and supplies, and through improving access to services through community engagement and strengthening referral mechanisms. The project will build the capacity of key health care personnel such as vison care professional and ASHA workers, which will ensure the delivery of quality service. The project will also sensitize the local community with relevant information relating to eye disease. The project will demonstrate an integrated, inclusive, replicable and sustainable model that can be scaled up across the country. The IT-enabled vision centers will be eco-friendly and disability-inclusive too.

The vision centers will act as a one-stop solution by carrying out mobilization in community, eye screening in community and schools, referrals and treatment—including cataract surgeries. It will reduce avoidable blindness among children, youths and adults preventing them from acquiring a permanent disability. The vision centers will also act as disability-inclusive centers, which stand as a model vision center.

The project will strengthen eye health services and infrastructure for delivery of high quality, affordable and accessible treatment through setting up and strengthening of vision centers.

The vision center will be IT-enabled, disability-inclusive and run on solar panels:

Month 1-2: Set up/strengthen vision center: The vision center will be opened in a rental facility and be furnished with basic facilities. Vision center at Alwar will be strengthened with teleophthalmology and new equipment.

Month 2-3: Provide desirable equipment and supplies: VC will be equipped with essential and desirable equipment and medicines as prescribed in vision 2020 manual

Month 3-4: Set up teleophthalmology services: Connect VC to the base hospital –district hospitals or private charity hospitals for advanced diagnosis and treatment with IT.

Month 3-4: Appoint trained staff:  Each VC shall be staffed with two community mobilizers, one vision technician and one vision center attendant. 

Month 3-4: Orientation training for staff: The training module includes units on the identification of common eye ailments, primary eye care, refraction, referral and organization of community-level outreach camps.

Month 3-4: Training to staff on disability inclusion: will help refer people for education, skilling, etc as per need

Month 3-4: Network with eye health departments: The vision center shall also take the lead in collaborating with eye health departments, CHCs, PHCs, and Sub PHCs and strengthen the system as well as duty bearers

Month 5: Start functioning the vision center with services: Screening, treatment of common eye problems, surveillance of eye diseases, edging and spectacle fitting, teleconsultation facility, follow up system on referrals, rehabilitation of incurably blind, etc.

Month 5: Community Awareness: mobilization and awareness training of representatives of PRIs and CBOs (SHGs, DPOs, Farmer Clubs, Anganwadi, Youth Clubs) and NGOs shall be done enabling them to refer people to vision centers.

Month 5-12: Outreach camps: Each vision center shall conduct one outreach camp per month. Community plays a major role in the mobilization of people to such camps.

Month 6-7: Install solar panels; install software for a paperless office

Month 8-10: Make VC accessible for persons with disabilities

The project will strengthen eye health services and infrastructure for delivery of high quality, affordable and accessible treatment through setting up and strengthening of vision centers.

 

The project will strengthen eye health services and infrastructure for delivery of high quality, affordable and accessible treatment through setting up and strengthening of vision centers.

 

The vision center will be IT-enabled, disability-inclusive and run on solar panels:

Month 1-2: Set up/strengthen vision center: The vision center will be opened in a rental facility and be furnished with basic facilities. Vision center at Alwar will be strengthened with teleophthalmology and new equipment.

Month 2-3: Provide desirable equipment and supplies: VC will be equipped with essential and desirable equipment and medicines as prescribed in vision 2020 manual

Month 3-4: Set up teleophthalmology services: Connect VC to the base hospital –district hospitals or private charity hospitals for advanced diagnosis and treatment with IT.

Month 3-4: Appoint trained staff:  Each VC shall be staffed with two community mobilizers, one vision technician and one vision center attendant. 

 

Month 3-4: Orientation training for staff: The training module includes units on the identification of common eye ailments, primary eye care, refraction, referral and organization of community-level outreach camps.

Month 3-4: Training to staff on disability inclusion: will help refer people for education, skilling, etc as per need

Month 3-4: Network with eye health departments: The vision center shall also take the lead in collaborating with eye health departments, CHCs, PHCs, and Sub PHCs and strengthen the system as well as duty bearers

Month 5: Start functioning the vision center with services: Screening, treatment of common eye problems, surveillance of eye diseases, edging and spectacle fitting, teleconsultation facility, follow up system on referrals, rehabilitation of incurably blind, etc.

Month 5: Community Awareness: mobilization and awareness training of representatives of PRIs and CBOs (SHGs, DPOs, Farmer Clubs, Anganwadi, Youth Clubs) and NGOs shall be done enabling them to refer people to vision centers.

Month 5-12: Outreach camps: Each vision center shall conduct one outreach camp per month. Community plays a major role in the mobilization of people to such camps.

Month 6-7: Install solar panels; install software for a paperless office

Month 8-10: Make VC accessible for persons with disabilities

 

Month 1-2: Set up/strengthen vision center: The vision center will be opened in a rental facility and be furnished with basic facilities. Vision center at Alwar will be strengthened with teleophthalmology and new equipment.

 

Month 2-3: Provide desirable equipment and supplies: VC will be equipped with essential and desirable equipment and medicines as prescribed in vision 2020 manual
 

 

Month 3-4: Set up teleophthalmology services: Connect VC to the base hospital –district hospitals or private charity hospitals for advanced diagnosis and treatment with IT.

 

Month 3-4: Appoint trained staff:  Each VC shall be staffed with two community mobilizers, one vision technician and one vision center attendant.  Month 3-4: Orientation training for staff: The training module includes units on the identification of common eye ailments, primary eye care, refraction, referral and organization of community-level outreach camps.

 

Month 3-4: Training to staff on disability inclusion: will help refer people for education, skilling, etc as per need

 

Month 3-4: Network with eye health departments: The vision center shall also take the lead in collaborating with eye health departments, CHCs, PHCs, and Sub PHCs and strengthen the system as well as duty bearers

 

Month 5: Start functioning the vision center with services:Screening, treatment of common eye problems, surveillance of eye diseases, edging and spectacle fitting, teleconsultation facility, follow up system on referrals, rehabilitation of incurably blind, etc.

 

Month 5: Community Awareness: mobilization and awareness training of representatives of PRIs and CBOs (SHGs, DPOs, Farmer Clubs, Anganwadi, Youth Clubs) and NGOs shall be done enabling them to refer people to vision centers.


Month 5-12: Outreach camps: Each vision center shall conduct one outreach camp per month. Community plays a major role in the mobilization of people to such camps.

 

Month 6-7: Install solar panels; install software for a paperless office

 

Month 8-10: Make VC accessible for persons with disabilities

 
 

Salient Features

  1. Disability Inclusive, IT enabled, Green vision centres
  2. Contributes to focus areas of the National Programme for Control of Blindness (NPCB)
  3. Primary eye care at door step
 

About CBM India Trust

CBM started its journey in India, in 1967 with education for visually impaired children in the state of Kerala. The programmes grew to include those with other disabilities, with community based rehabilitation and education programmes. The operations were run by CBM Liaison office. In 1994 CBM started a new entity named CBM India Trust. The registered trust under the Indian Trust Act 1882 having its registration No. 431/1994 started the work across India focusing on disability inclusion.


CBM’s strategy is designed to bring effective transformational change to the lives and communities of persons with disabilities living in poverty, by becoming the leading organisation in Disability-Inclusive Development. The strategic goals of CBM is to strengthen the voice and autonomy of people with disabilities (individuals); Build resilient inclusive communities (communities); Build inclusive and sustainable local and national systems and services (systems); Ensure that populations affected by natural and man-made disasters have access to inclusive humanitarian assistance and protection (emergencies). Our thematic focus is health, education and livelihood.

CBM started its journey in India, in 1967 with education for visually impaired children in the state of Kerala. The programmes grew to include those with other disabilities, with community based rehabilitation and education programmes. The operations were run by CBM Liaison office. In 1994 CBM started a new entity named CBM India Trust. The registered trust under the Indian Trust Act 1882 having its registration No. 431/1994 started the work across India focusing on disability inclusion.
CBM’s strategy is designed to bring effective transformational change to the lives and communities of persons with disabilities living in poverty, by becoming the leading organisation in Disability-Inclusive Development. The strategic goals of CBM is to strengthen the voice and autonomy of people with disabilities (individuals); Build resilient inclusive communities (communities); Build inclusive and sustainable local and national systems and services (systems); Ensure that populations affected by natural and man-made disasters have access to inclusive humanitarian assistance and protection (emergencies). Our thematic focus is health, education and livelihood.
 
 

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