Strengthening Value Chain of pulses in Karlamunda Block of Kalahandi District, Odisha (SVCP)- CSR Projects India
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Last Updated:  06/08/2019

 

Project Pitch By: Indo Global Social Service Society

 

Proposed Project Title


Strengthening Value Chain of pulses in Karlamunda Block of Kalahandi District, Odisha (SVCP)

 

Thematic Area

Eradicating hunger, poverty and malnutrition, promoting health care, sanitation & safe drinking water

Sub Thematic Area

Livelihood Programmes

Project Synopsis

Kalahandi is a part of the KBK (Kalahandi, Bolangir and Koraput) region of the Odisha State considered as one of the most backward regions of the country. Demographic characteristics of the district reflect that it is predominantly rural and has a high concentration of weaker sections, i.e., ST and SC communities. Kalahandi is the predominant pulse production belt of Odisha. Green Gram and Arhar covers around 50% of the area covered under pulse crops during kharif and Rabi in the district. Most of the farmers presently grow pulses primarily for consumption purpose. There is a high deficit in the pulse requirement of the families in the area. Lack of technical knowledge, poor asset base of marginal farmers coupled with aggressive promotion of cash crops and inputs usually makes pulse cultivation unviable. The proposed project will be cover 300 pulse farmers from among 6 Gram Panchayats of Karlamunda Block
 
 
 

Overview of the Proposed Project

Estimated Budget
INR 0.6 Cr - INR 1.0 Cr
Proposed Location
Kalahandi

Key Project Partners
Government,Gram Panchayat,Companies

Project Status
Active
 

Facts

Beneficiary Type (Primary): Small land holding farmers from predominantly SC and ST communities
Beneficiary Type (Secondary): Women
Estimated No. of Beneficiaries: 100 - 500 Individuals
Status of Baseline Survey: Already Done
 
 
 

Proposed Project Description

Kalahandi is located in western Odisha, commonly referred to as Tatlagarh (hot zone) due to its high temperature and long dry season. The entire area is rich in minerals. Iron ore, bauxite, coal, dolomite, graphite, manganese ore, fireclay and precious stone deposits. The entire zone is attracting considerable attention from Giant global entities for mining and allied industries.

 

Kalahandi is a part of the KBK (Kalahandi, Bolangir and Koraput) region of the State considered as one of the most backward regions of the country. Demographic characteristics of the district reflect that it is predominantly rural and has a high concentration of weaker sections, i.e., ST and SC communities.

 

Kalahandi currently has the highest number of rice mills in the state as a result of the Indravati Water Project. But the effects has not been even. There still exist large pockets which are unreached. The poor marginal, small and landless farmers continue to eke out subsistence through rain fed mono crop. Despite wide forest coverage, these constituencies are not able to benefit from the large NTFP market.

 

Drought has been a constant feature of the area and recently, saw droughts in 2015, 16 and 2018. These have had a devastating impact on the lives and livelihoods in the area with the small, marginal and landless most affected. Drought continues to erode the productivity of their small land holdings which in turn brings only a few months food security, necessitating seasonal migration in search of work as daily wage labour. The Karlamunda Block is one such unreached pocket.

 

Pulse crops play an important role in Indian agriculture. It forms an essential component of the Indian diet as Dal-Roti/Bhat (pulses and chapatti /rice) denotes complete and essential meal. Besides being rich in protein, they sustain the productivity of the cropping system. Their ability to use atmospheric nitrogen through biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is economically sound and environmentally acceptable.

 

Kalahandi is the predominant pulse production belt of Odisha. Green Gram and Arhar covers around 50% of the area covered under pulse crops during kharif and Rabi in the district. Most of the farmers presently grow pulses primarily for consumption purpose. There is a high deficit in the pulse requirement of the families in the area. State level data show that there is a deficit of 0.88 lakh tones of pulse requirement.

 

As per data of Odisha University of Agriculture and Technology (OUAT) pulses are grown in 20.8 lakh ha area with production of 10.6 lakh tonnes and productivity of 508 kg/ha. The contribution of Green Gram to the total pulse area is 42%, Black Gram 27%, Horse Gram 11% and Arhar 6.7%. The share of Green Gram, Black Gram, Horse Gram and Arhar towards total production is 39%, 24.5%, 8.5% and 11.7 %, respectively. Kharif pulses constitute 33% area and 36% production with productivity of 559 kg/ha while Rabi pulse area is 67% contributing 64% of production with a productivity of 481 kg/ha. Green Gram, Black Gram, Horse Gram and Arhar combined contribute 87% of total pulse area and 84% of total production.

 

In Karlamunda, rain fed paddy on small fractured plots is the main crop of the asset poor marginal farmers, those with low lands. Pulse cultivation is also undertaken but in small quantities mainly in uplands where the soil depth is low and hence low fertility in the uplands. Almost all uplands are acidic in nature which affects plant growth. Lack of technical knowhow combined with erratic rains, leads to poor crops, deterring the cash strapped farmers to undertake it on a larger scale.  The increasingly erratic rainfall patterns alternating with drought like conditions results in declining productivity from these small plots necessitating the marginal farmers to look for alternative employment mainly wage labour in nearby towns.

 

As a result, large tracts of lands, mainly uplands and some mid land lie fallow as the economically constrained farmers do not have the means to convert these lands for cultivation. Low nutrient consuming, drought tolerant crops like pulses would be suitable for these lands. There is immense potential to expand the cultivation of pulse crops in the area because of the availability of large chunk of suitable uplands.

 

The proposed project will be cover 300 pulse farmers from among 6 Gram Panchayats of Karlamunda Block. The project would benefit 300 households directly through its interventions and about 500 households indirectly due to its ripple effect in the surroundings of project locations.

 

The Intervention will benefit address the constraints of the existing production faced by marginal farmers as well as through the formation of Farmer Producer Company, help them reach the market.

 

Strategies for implementation: 

  1. Marginal farmers from BPL families would be the target of the proposed intervention. Farmers from ST and SC category will be given priority.
  2. Facilitate skill transfer to selected farmers for undertaking profitable Pulse Cultivation
  3. Facilitate 300 farmers into 30 Producer Groups
  4. Facilitate one Farmer Producer Organisation comprising these 30 Producer Groups and support its strengthening for a sustainable Pulse Value Chain Intervention. 
  5. Business plan development in order to institutionalize the production through proper channel
  6. Strong Market Linkages with established and private vendor

 

ROI/Unit Cost Investment/Return on Investment

The processing of dal in dal mill and sale after value addition has a good potential for generating profits. There are two options.

i) The Farmers Producer Company will purchase the raw product and process it and sale the dal for which capital is required.

ii) Second Option is Farmers Producer Company outsources the milling to external dal mills, charges paid by the farmers. In this option, no capital is required.

Both are viable options and the FPC can follow a combination of both.

 

Expected impact on target group:

Enhanced income security of marginal farmers through Farmer Producer Company through Pulse Value Chain 

 
 

Salient Features

  1. 300 Target farmers have enhanced income by undertaking sustainable agri based Entrepreneurship Models of Pulse Value Chain
  2. Thirty Pulse Farmer Producer Groups formed
  3. 30 FPOs linked directly to market through Farmer Producer Company
 

About Indo Global Social Service Society

IGSSS is a non-profit development organization, established in 1961 to support development programmes across India, especially to empower the vulnerable communities and grassroots community based organizations. Currently, we are present in 17 states and one Union Territory of India.


Through the years, IGSSS has evolved as a major player in the development sector in India, working on the themes of Sustainable Livelihood, Climate Change Adaptation, Disaster Risk Reduction, Urban Poverty Reduction, Gender Equity and Youth Development. They are accredited by Credibility Alliance, registered with NGO Darpan (NITI Aayog’s -Indian government platform) and BSE Sammaan.  

 
 

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